Buckwheat

I’ve found many reasons to love buckwheat: it’s gluten free, packed with protein, and easy to prepare. Get buckwheat recipes at TwiceasTasty.com.
My first memorable encounters with buckwheat grouts were in Russia. In the United States, roasted buckwheat grouts are typically sold as “kasha,” but in Russia, all the каша I ate as a hot breakfast cereal was a mix of grains. My Russian friends tended to cook buckwheat on its own—traditionally in an oven until it softened to a porridge—and serve it as a savory meal more than a sweet one.

I’ve since found many reasons to love buckwheat. Despite its name in English, it’s not a type of wheat: it’s actually a gluten-free seed in the same plant family as rhubarb. So if wheat isn’t on your diet, buckwheat is your friend. Unlike some gluten-free grains, it’s packed with protein and amino acids. Soaking it removes some of its phytic acid, which can make it easier to digest. A presoak also speeds up the cooking process—instead of a slow bake in a low-temp oven, you can have it ready from the stovetop in 5 minutes for a modern take on каша сименуха, a traditional Russian breakfast, or for an easy dinner with roasted vegetables.

Ready to give it a try? Full details are in the recipe below, but here are the basics:
You need just 4 main ingredients plus some salt and butter.
1. Soak the buckwheat grouts and hard-boil the eggs.
2. Cook the grouts.
3. Sauté onion and mushrooms.
4. Combine everything and enjoy.

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Buckwheat Porridge with Mushrooms and Eggs

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: 3
  • Print
1/2 cup raw buckwheat grouts
2-1/2 cups water, divided
3 eggs
1/8 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1 bay leaf
4 large cremini or wild mushrooms (about 3 ounces)
1 small onion (about 6 ounces)
2 tablespoons butter, divided
sour cream (optional)

The night before, add the buckwheat to a bowl or large glass measuring cup, and then pour in about 2 cups of water. Presoak the groats overnight in the fridge. In the morning, transfer them to a fine-mesh colander, rinse under running water, and then drain. Hard-boil the eggs, either the previous night or in the morning, as you would for Basic Potato Salad: Add the eggs to a small pot of simmering water, return the water to a boil, and cook for 10 minutes. Plunge immediately into a cold-water bath; don’t peel until fully cooled.

In a small pot, bring the buckwheat and remaining 1/2 cup of water to a boil; add the salt and bay leaf. Cook for about 5 minutes, adding water as needed to keep it from sticking, until crumbly and soft. Remove from the heat, pull out the bay leaf, and cover the pot with a lid.

Chop the onions, and slice the mushrooms. Chop 1 egg; slice the other 2 eggs. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of butter over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté for 4–5 minutes, until golden. Add the mushrooms and sauté 3–4 minutes, until soft. Stir in the buckwheat, remaining butter, and chopped egg; heat just until the mixture begins to steam. Serve immediately, topped with the egg slices and sour cream on the side, if desired. Serves 2.

Tips & Tricks
  • Preplanning really brings this recipe to life. If you have soaked grouts and hard-boiled eggs in the fridge, breakfast is ready in about 10 minutes—or less if you use leftover sautéed vegetables.
  • This recipe also fits the one prep, two meals plan. Prep a larger batch of grouts, and you’re ready for breakfast and dinner (see below); cooked buckwheat keeps several days in the fridge.
  • As written, this recipe is so Russian: nothing more aromatic than a bay leaf. But you can flavor it to your tastes. Experiment with heat, zing, and your favorite stored or seasonal veg.
  • Even if your tastes are as mild as a Russian’s, you can upscale with leeks or shallots and wild mushrooms. We look for morels in spring, shaggy manes in summer, and chanterelles in fall.


I’ve found many reasons to love buckwheat: it’s gluten free, packed with protein, and easy to prepare. Get buckwheat recipes at TwiceasTasty.com.

Twice as Tasty

I’ve found many reasons to love buckwheat: it’s gluten free, packed with protein, and easy to prepare. Get buckwheat recipes at TwiceasTasty.com.If you fall in love with buckwheat for breakfast, just wait until you start serving it at dinnertime. This hearty “grain” makes a filling meal after a long day of work or play, and as with morning grouts, a little foresight can put dinner quickly on the table.

The recipe here can be added to your rotation of meals that use winter storage vegetables, giving plenty of prep-ahead options. It calls for just a bit of squash, so you can choose a small variety like delicata or sweet dumpling, or you can cube up a larger squash or pumpkin and use the extra throughout the week for pasta, curry, risotto, and soup. Or you can roast up a larger pan of winter veg, eat it as a side at other meals, and then mix the leftovers with some buckwheat as its last hurrah.

Ready to give it a try? Full details are in the recipe below, but here are the basics:
You need just 2 main ingredients plus some dried herbs and winter veg.
1. Soak the buckwheat grouts and marinate the tofu.
2. Roast the vegetables.
3. Cook the grouts.
4. Mix it all together and enjoy.

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Roasted Vegetables with Tofu and Buckwheat

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: 3
  • Print
3/4 cup raw buckwheat grouts
3-3/4 cups water, divided
14 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and cubed
1-1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
1-1/2 teaspoons dried rosemary
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1-1/2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
3 carrots (about 4 ounces), cut into chunks
2 potatoes (about 12 ounces), cubed
1/2 pound winter squash (about 1-1/2 cups when cubed)
3 cloves garlic in their skins
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
Roasted Squash Seeds (optional)

Presoak the buckwheat as you would for Buckwheat Porridge with Mushrooms and Eggs: In the morning, combine the grouts and about 3 cups of water; refrigerate. Rinse before cooking. Put the tofu cubes, oregano, and rosemary in a lidded container. Pour in 3 tablespoons of oil and the vinegar; toss to combine. Let the tofu marinate in the fridge 2 hours to all day.

Add the cubes of carrot, potato, and pumpkin and the garlic cloves to a baking dish; sprinkle with salt and drizzle with the remaining tablespoon of olive oil. Bake at 425°F for 25–30 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the tofu to the top of the vegetables and roast an additional 5 minutes.

In a small pot, bring the buckwheat and remaining 3/4 cup of water to the boil. Cook for about 5 minutes, until crumbly and soft. Mix into the vegetables and tofu, and adjust the seasonings to taste. Serve sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds, if desired. Serves 4.

Tips & Tricks
  • Marinated tofu adds protein and flavor, and it’s easy to prep ahead and leave until dinnertime. But other protein works as well: chickpeas for vegans, hard-boiled eggs for ovo-vegetarians, fish for pescatarians, and other meats for carnivores. If you stick with tofu, note that the cubes merely warm in the oven and will still have a soft texture. If you want crispy cubes, give them a pan fry.
  • As with buckwheat porridge, you can alter the vegetable mix to suit your season and tastes. Roasted beets are a delicious winter option and will give the grouts a pinkish hue. Treat it like Potato–Mushroom–Spinach Curry and give the tofu a curried marinade to accompany those veg. Or simply grab whatever you need to use up from your fridge.


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