Pear Desserts

Pears work well in simple, forgiving desserts, like a freeform pastry. Get pear recipes at TwiceasTasty.com.
If you’re harvesting your final homegrown melons of the year or just starting your growing season in the Southern Hemisphere, you likely got excited about last week’s watermelon treats. But if you’re in fall harvest mode, late-season fruits are likely dominating your table. These can be just as tasty in sweet treats as melons and berries and can be used in just as many ways.

I turn many fall fruits into canned goods we can savor and share all year, such as jams, marmalades, fruit butters, and of course Grandma Tiny’s Chunky Applesauce. For everyday eating, I turn to semisweet baked goods that last several days in the fridge or can be frozen and enjoyed in small doses, such as Quick Cranberry Bread and Double Apple Muffins. For a special treat amid fall harvest overload, pears work well in simple, forgiving desserts, like a freeform pastry.
Learn to make Pear and Goat Cheese Galette and other desserts with pears

Watermelon Treats

Melons’ natural sweetness and juiciness make them ideal for refreshing desserts. Get watermelon recipes at TwiceasTasty.com.
It looks like today could be the last 80°F day of the season in my area, so it’s the best time to enjoy a refreshing, cold, fruity dessert. Watermelon are still available in the local markets, and homegrown ones are still ripening on the vine. They won’t last much longer in the shops or the greenhouse.

Melons may not be the first fruits you think of when you consider a dessert; apples, strawberries, raspberries, and huckleberries are all more likely candidates. But melons have the advantage of pairing their natural sweetness with a satisfyingly slurpy moisture, making them ideal for refreshing desserts. Throw in some fresh herbs for bright, contrasting notes, and you’ll successfully capture the feel of summer in a bowl or glass. Better yet, your freezer and refrigerator will let you hold onto that feeling long after temperatures have dropped.
Learn to make Watermelon–Mint Sorbet and Watermelon–Basil Shrub

Coffee Cake

The name “coffee cake” says it all: you’re making a cake but have an excuse to eat it before 10 am. Get coffee cake recipes at TwiceasTasty.com.
Because I tend to enjoy sweet things more for breakfast than after-dinner dessert, coffee cake has always been high on my list. The name says it all: you’re making a cake but have an excuse to eat it in the morning.

Although the sugar and fat in granola and muffin recipes might be scaled down or up to make them healthier or more like candy or cupcakes, coffee cakes tend to be both sweet and buttery. They have far more sugar than your standard “sweet” breakfast fare, from a pinch in crepes, to molasses-sweetened Gingerbread Pancakes, to a few tablespoons in scones. So I save my longtime coffee cake favorites for special occasions, tweaking them where I can to cut back on the richness but mostly just enjoying every bite.

Learn to make Cinnamon Streusel Coffee Cake and Big Berry Coffee Cake

A Little Sweetness

Recipes with a little sweetness use what’s in season and in your pantry. Learn more at TwiceasTasty.com.
I’m going to keep this post short, because my mind is still buried in pickles and my forthcoming cookbook. You’ve been hearing about it vaguely for months, and official announcements, giveaways, launch party invites, and more are on their way to newsletter subscribers and blog followers in the coming weeks. (But since you’re reading this, you may want to check out the preorder page on Amazon.) And next month, I’ll be sharing recipes directly from the book.

In the meantime, I thought a break from pickles might be good for me—and you. So this month, I’ll be sharing some sweeter recipes that use what’s in season and in your pantry.
Read more about a little sweetness