Winding Down Year 5

I’m celebrating the end of 2020 and kicking off 2021 with giveaways. Learn more at TwiceasTasty.com.
2020 has been quite the year for us all. But fortunately, I can focus on positive changes for Twice as Tasty. Despite limits on in-person workshops and other live events, Twice as Tasty has grown and thrived this year, particularly with the publication of my first cookbook and its accompanying recipe collection. It feels fabulous to be able to reflect on happy developments and highlight good news in such a challenging year. Read on, and you’ll be smiling too, or skip down the page to read about the year to come.
Read more about what to expect in 2021

Winding Down Year 4

I’m kicking off 2020 with two tasty online events: a giveaway and a challenge. Learn more at TwiceasTasty.com.
Twice as Tasty will officially turn 4 next June, but the approaching end of 2019 has me reflecting on the past year and pondering the directions to take the blog and Twice as Tasty Live in the year to come. It seems that this past year was all about settling in: The blog has found its rhythm, and the models I’ve developed for workshops and other live events keep them running smoothly. (Read on, and you’ll see what I mean.) Things are running so smoothly that I’m tossing around ideas that will put more on the 2020 table. (Skip down the page to read about the year to come.)
Read more about what to expect in 2020

Sourdough Rye Bread

I craved tangy rye bread long before I started working with sourdough—or discovered a meatless Reuben. Get sourdough and vegetarian recipes at TwiceasTasty.com.
I was on a mission to make a tangy rye bread long before I started working with sourdough. It all began when I arrived in St. Petersburg, Russia, on one of the coldest days on record. I’d just come from Norway, where I’d fallen in love with gjetost, a whey-based goat cheese that’s the color of caramel, has the richness of fudge, and melts on your tongue. Before leaving the country, I splurged on a log so large you can’t find it in the States. It was usually served with dry crispbread in Norway. Once I was settled in Russia, I discovered my favorite pairing for the cheese: Russian black bread.

The rye bread I ate in Russian bore little resemblance to what’s typically labeled “Russian rye” in America: no instant coffee, no cocoa powder, no caraway, no corn syrup. It was simply flour, water, and salt, all leavened with a sponge or starter. In other words, a sourdough bread. The problem was getting a recipe. Bread was subsidized when I was in Russia; a rye loaf cost 33p (about $1), and no one I met in the city was making it at home. The bakers where I bought my bread clearly thought I was a crazy American when I asked for the recipe: they started spouting ratios I could barely understand that seemed to start with about 50 pounds of flour.
Learn to make Sourdough Rye Bread and Gorgeous Grilled Cheese